Chapter 7: Eastside Trail
Chapter 7: Eastside Trail

The total cost of the Eastside Trail, which included $750,000 from Trees Atlanta for the BeltLine arboretum plantings, topped $12 million – far more than the original $5 million estimate – and over half had to come out of the TAD bond money, since there were no matching...

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Chapter 6
Chapter 6

I realized that what human beings need, whether they are wealthy or homeless, is a sense of dignity and their own independence and choice.

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Chapter 6
Chapter 6

People become homeless – unable to rent or own a normal roof over their heads – for a variety of reasons, including illness, bad decisions, criminal records, post-traumatic stress among veterans, unemployment, drug or alcohol addiction, physical disability, or simply the...

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Chapter 5
Chapter 5

Though Montague had left, the battered BeltLine project would continue under new leadership, and the vision of a loop of trails, parks, and transit still attracted most Atlantans, whether they lived in Buckhead mansions or Bankhead slums. For the city’s large homeless...

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Chapter 5
Chapter 5

Mayor Shirley Franklin wrote an urgent letter to Congressman John Lewis, seeking help to counter what she called “GDOT’s boorish behavior and Amtrak’s willingness to play along.” The outraged mayor complained: “For a state agency to now flip-flop and at the last minute...

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Chapter 5
Chapter 5

The vacant homes in the southern part of the city stood in stark contrast to the gigantic “McMansions” thrown up in wealthy northern Atlanta neighborhoods, where they had become so numerous by 2006 that Shirley Franklin had issued a temporary moratorium on such massive...

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Chapter 5
Chapter 5

Beginning in 2001, scam artists like Kevin Wiggins demonstrated how mortgage fraud could work in West End, where he purchased dozens of homes in poor condition for as little as $24,000, then deeded them to unqualified straw buyers, such as college students or relatives...

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Seven Days Review
Seven Days Review

Offering both an account of Atlanta’s tumultuous history and an anatomical breakdown of the BeltLine project so far, Pendergrast situates City on the Verge within the larger context of urban America’s future. A must-read for urban-planning junkies, it should...

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